As Needed for Pain: A Memoir of Addiction

As Needed for Pain: A Memoir of Addiction

In the vein of Mary Karrs Lit, Augusten Burroughs Dry and Sarah Hepolas Blackout, As Needed for Pain is a raw and rivetingand often wryly funnyaddiction memoir from one of New York medias most accomplished editors which explores his never-before-told story of opioid addiction and the drastic impact it had on his life and career.Dan Peres wasnt born to be a media insider....

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Title:As Needed for Pain: A Memoir of Addiction
Author:Dan Peres
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As Needed for Pain: A Memoir of Addiction Reviews

  • Marika

    Author Dan Peres was Editor-in-Chief of Details for fifteen years. He hung out with celebrities, rock stars, and generally the in-crowd. What looked glittery on the outside hid an ugly truth. Dan was addicted to opiates. And by addicted I mean 30 pills per day just to function. Not to get high. Peres is a gifted author who is able to write about the psychological and physical aspects of addiction. Riveting memoir about personal journey that is teachable for those who are willing.

    * I read an

    Author Dan Peres was Editor-in-Chief of Details for fifteen years. He hung out with celebrities, rock stars, and generally the in-crowd. What looked glittery on the outside hid an ugly truth. Dan was addicted to opiates. And by addicted I mean 30 pills per day just to function. Not to get high. Peres is a gifted author who is able to write about the psychological and physical aspects of addiction. Riveting memoir about personal journey that is teachable for those who are willing.

    * I read an advance copy and was not compensated

  • Cari

    Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the early review copy. From the moment I started reading this book, I could not put it down. Peres was the editor of Details magazine, and he kept company with many celebrities. There are fascinating stories here, particularly of Peres's hero, David Copperfield. But Peres had a secret - he'd become addicted to opioid pills following a back injury. Peres's journey is a smoothly-written heartbreak - you're rooting for him from page one. This is an

    Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the early review copy. From the moment I started reading this book, I could not put it down. Peres was the editor of Details magazine, and he kept company with many celebrities. There are fascinating stories here, particularly of Peres's hero, David Copperfield. But Peres had a secret - he'd become addicted to opioid pills following a back injury. Peres's journey is a smoothly-written heartbreak - you're rooting for him from page one. This is an important book, especially for those who believe that addiction isn't a disease. This is a true story, an addiction borne from prescriptions, a real-life nightmare that is all too familiar for many people in this day and age. Dan Peres's story filled me with a deep sense of empathy for the author and a sincere wish that he would make it out from the abyss.

  • Debi

    Must Read!

  • Matthew Stetz

    Weird relationship with David Copperfield.

  • Lisa Marsh

    I worked with @dan_peres very early in our respective careers. And in those days, it seemed to be all about a party or going out. Really. And I remember stories -- good stories of fun... maybe too much fun -- none of which made this book (thankfully).

    But that's the point. This is not a tell-all. You will not find funny anecdotes about bold faced names and magazine editors imbibing too much.

    It's a memoir of addiction -- Dan's addiction and how he practiced his craft as an addict. The amount of

    I worked with @dan_peres very early in our respective careers. And in those days, it seemed to be all about a party or going out. Really. And I remember stories -- good stories of fun... maybe too much fun -- none of which made this book (thankfully).

    But that's the point. This is not a tell-all. You will not find funny anecdotes about bold faced names and magazine editors imbibing too much.

    It's a memoir of addiction -- Dan's addiction and how he practiced his craft as an addict. The amount of pills he admits to taking daily is head-wrecking it's a wonder he's alive, but he lived to tell this story. And it's an important story to share.

    In the book, he shares that all addicts lie -- he shares some of the whoppers he told his loved ones and co-workers -- and often get away with it. That's such an important point, at least to me.

    Sadly, we all are familiar with addiction in our society whether it's in your community, your workplace or your family. This book sheds some light on what the user is going through. It feels like this book is in some way Dan making amends to the world at large. I think it will help.

    ******

    #bookstagram #bookchallenge2020 #recovery #soberlife #addiction

  • Lisa Baggerman

    It was a little weird how this book was told in vignettes instead of a straight narrative, which kind of left me hanging in certain parts. (What happened after he got the pink gown?!?)

  • Mehrsa

    This was a good memoir about addiction, but it is not a particularly deep one. It's also just amazing how much crime a white addict can get away with without getting caught.

  • Jessica Olson

    Pretty good book, but the author focused a lot on...ahem...women and their anatomy and it was distracting at times. He also introduced certain plot points that never resolved that I was curious about. Still it was pretty well written and insightful

  • Amanda Mccormick

    When I was a wee lass in college, I used to read and love Details magazine (this was in the mid-late 90s) . It was completely awesome, and seemed to be written for both men and women, thinking particularly of Anka Radakovich's sex column which was a pretty cool template of sex positive feminism and assertiveness in my dawning young awareness of the relations between men & women. Generally a bible of NYC-centric cosmopolitan cool that I liked to fantasize about one day embodying. So when I

    When I was a wee lass in college, I used to read and love Details magazine (this was in the mid-late 90s) . It was completely awesome, and seemed to be written for both men and women, thinking particularly of Anka Radakovich's sex column which was a pretty cool template of sex positive feminism and assertiveness in my dawning young awareness of the relations between men & women. Generally a bible of NYC-centric cosmopolitan cool that I liked to fantasize about one day embodying. So when I heard this memoir was coming out of an early Details editor, I snapped it up, only later to learn that Dan Peres is actually the guy who took over...after all the cool writers and editors were scrapped and the magazine became super douchey and generic. There's actually a part of this book where Peres says something along the lines of "we wanted to make a magazine for men who wanted something more hard hitting that babes on the cover" completely forgetting about Esquire and GQ, and for that matter, some of Playboy's fine journalistic endeavors. Ok dude.

    So...reading this as an addiction memoir, I also had mixed feelings about this book. I found myself thinking about how in order to be interested in a memoir you have to be on board with both the general hook (in this case, that's the hot topic of opioid painkiller addition, a ground less trodden in the genre thus far), and the person telling the story. In regards to the later aspect, "the person telling the story" is not up to par with many others in this world. I'm comparing this mostly to Permanent Midnight which is a fave of mine. I constantly got the feeling Peres was holding back at portraying himself as a total scumbag in an effort to seem "likable" or "human" and what that ultimately does is water down the drama and transformation of the story. Jerry Stahl has no such compunction so his narrative packs a real punch. So as a tale this one's a little bit meh. There were parts that I liked but overall not a standout.

  • John Tomkiw

    Typically, memoirs are rife with lessons, both implied and explicit...lessons for the author and lessons for the reader. Here, however, the only takeaway is that there's a ton of excess in the the 80s-90s-00s, publishing ranks. The author outlines years of not-showing-up, leaning on subordinates to do the heavy lifting of producing a monthly magazine and generally screwing up every relationship. So Conde Nast had limos waiting to take the drug-addled home. So expense reports covered trips to

    Typically, memoirs are rife with lessons, both implied and explicit...lessons for the author and lessons for the reader. Here, however, the only takeaway is that there's a ton of excess in the the 80s-90s-00s, publishing ranks. The author outlines years of not-showing-up, leaning on subordinates to do the heavy lifting of producing a monthly magazine and generally screwing up every relationship. So Conde Nast had limos waiting to take the drug-addled home. So expense reports covered trips to Mexico for bags of pills. So people looked the other way when the author, the chief honcho at Details, nodded off in meetings, or overdosed on the couch in his office. The book covers the waterfront of addiction, but comes up short on the motivating factors for getting clean, relegating his epiphany to a rushed ending. In sum, the book is short on juicy details (pun intended) from the publishing world, and short on insights into addiction.

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